THE PROFESSOR’S POP QUIZ - PREVIOUS QUESTIONS

September 2017:
In a stroke play competition, the following Local Rule is in effect: “Dropping Zone: If a ball is in or it is known or virtually certain that a ball that has not been found is in the water hazard on Hole # 6, the player may proceed under Rule 26-1; or as an additional option, drop a ball, under penalty of one stroke, in the dropping zone.” While playing the 7th hole, a player’s tee shot comes to rest in the water hazard on the 6th hole. He determines the point where the ball last crossed the margin of the water hazard, then proceeds to the Dropping Zone, which is located about 50 yards closer to the hole than this point and drops a ball. He then plays it to the 7th putting green and holes out in two putts. In the Score Card Collection Area, he informs the Committee of what occurred while playing the 7th hole. The Committee should rule that the player:
 
A)  proceeded correctly. (Appendix I-A-6. Dropping Zones)

B)  should be penalized two strokes for playing from a wrong place.

C)  should return to the 7th hole, taking a drop as prescribed in Rule 26-1 and complete the hole. 

D)  should be disqualified for a serious breach of Rule 20-7.
 
 
August 2017:
In a stroke play event, A plays a shot to the putting green, leaving a pitch-mark just off the green. B’s next stroke results in the ball coming to rest directly behind A's pitch-mark. C then plays her next stroke onto the putting green, leaving a second pitch-mark adjacent to A's and also on B's line of play. While B is considering how to play her next stroke, C, realizing her pitch-mark was affecting play for B, repairs both her own and A’s pitch-mark. The group informs the Committee about this situation, which should rule that:
 
A)  There are no penalties and B should play her ball as it lies.

B)  There are no penalties, but B must recreate C's pitch-mark before playing her next stroke.

C)  C incurs a two-stroke penalty and B should play her ball as it lies. (Reference: D1-2/0.7)

D)  C incurs a two-stroke penalty and B must recreate C's pitch-mark before playing her next stroke.
 
 
July 2017:
The water in a water hazard is overflowing the margin of the hazard. A player's stroke sends his ball into the overflow which is now carrying the ball on the course. The player may do which of the following:
 
A)  He may lift the ball while it is moving and take relief from the casual water or play the ball while it is moving.

B)  He may lift the ball while it is moving and take relief from the casual water, but he may not play the ball while it is moving. Explanation: The player is entitled to relief once he is in the casual water, regardless of whether it's moving in a dynamic flow of casual water or at rest in the casual water. His point of reference for relief may change based on the position of the ball once it's lifted by the player.

C)  He may not lift the ball while it is moving, but he may play it.

D)  He may not lift or play the ball until it has stopped moving.

 
June 2017:
In stroke play, with the local rule regarding accidental movement of a ball on the putting green in effect, a player has a putt for a four. He holes the putt and then informs a Committee member that after he started his back swing but before his putter made contact, the ball moved and was still in motion when his putter struck the ball. The Committee should rule:
 
A)  The stroke counts and the player's score for the hole is four. (R 14-5)

B)  The stroke counts and the player incurs a one-stroke penalty for a score of five.

C)  The player must replace the ball where it lay before the stroke and replay his last stroke.

D)  The player incurs a one-stroke penalty and must replace the ball where it lay before the stroke.
 
 
May 2017:
Players A & B are playing a match on a course they have never played before and have just completed the 12th hole with A one up. There is no referee assigned to the match. From the next tee, A’s tee shot lands out of bounds. After B plays to the middle of the fairway, A plays and lands in a fairway bunker lying three. As they walk up the fairway, a Committee member inquires about the status of the match and is told that A is one up after 12 holes. The Committee member informs them that they are playing the 16th hole. They ask the Committee member what they should do. A would prefer to abandon play and play from the 13th tee. B would prefer to continue play of the 16th hole. The Committee member should inform them:
 
A)  A and B may agree to complete play on holes 16 through 18 before returning to the 13th tee if needed to settle the match.

B)  When A teed off from the wrong tee, he lost the hole. The match is all square and they must proceed to the 13th tee.

C)  A and B may agree to continue play of the 16th hole before proceeding to the 13th tee or proceed directly to the 13th tee.

D)  A and B must proceed immediately to the 13th tee or risk disqualification. Explanation: The players have both made a mistake by teeing off from the incorrect hole. Although not assigned to the match, the Committee member becomes involved in the match once the players ask “What should we do?” A and B must proceed immediately to the 13th tee or risk disqualification, as directed by the Committee member.
 
 
April 2017:
A competitor plays his tee shot to the putting green of a par-3 hole. He places a mark behind his ball on the putting green and observes his putt from the other side of the hole. After reviewing his putt from this angle, he returns to his ball and as he is about to lift it, the ball begins to roll away from the hole. The competitor stops the ball and replaces it in front of his mark. He removes the mark and holes the putt. His marker records a 2 for the hole. After the competitor has signed his score card and returned it to the Committee, a fellow-competitor questions his actions. His score for the hole is:
 
A) 2

B) 6

C) 8 (R1-2, R6-6d Exception)

D) He is Disqualified
 
 
October 2016:
In stroke play, a player’s tee shot lands in an area of deep rough. He announces and plays a second ball provisionally into the same area of rough. Arriving at the landing area of the two shots, the player is informed by a spotter that a ball, located by the spotter, is the second shot played. After an unsuccessful five-minute search for the original ball, the player plays the ball identified by the spotter as the provisional ball onto the putting green and two-putts. He retrieves the ball from the hole and realizes that it is his original ball. A rules official informs him that he’s played a wrong ball and that he must return to the place from which he played what he thought was his provisional ball and drop another ball. He does so, playing a shot onto the putting green, and two-putts. The player tees off the next hole, at which point a member of the Committee informs him that the Rules official erred in having him play from the place where he thought his provisional ball had come to rest. The player’s score for the hole is:
 
A) 4

B) 9 (D 27/5, D 27/4, D 34-3/3.3)

C) 11

D) Disqualified

 
 
September 2016:
On a course a player does not know well he plays his tee shot towards a wooded area on the right. He properly announces and plays a provisional ball towards a wooded area on the left. He announces and plays a second provisional again towards the wooded area on the left. The player goes forward to search for his original and before he gets to where it might be he notices a large number of people searching. He announces he’s returning to the tee to play another provisional.
An official arrives at the scene and after a brief conversation with the searchers who are all convinced the original ball has landed in a lateral hazard in the woods, the official concludes it is known or virtually  certain the ball is in the water hazard.
He attempts to communicate this information to the player but before the official can make contact, the player plays the fourth ball from the tee once again towards the wooded area on the left. Spectators on the hole inform the official that all three balls played to the left have been found.
At this point, the player lies:
 
A) 3 with the fourth ball played from the tee.

B) 5 with the fourth ball played from the tee.

C) 7 with the fourth ball played from the tee.

D) 1 with his original tee ball and he may play it or proceed under R26. (Reference: Decision 27-2a/4)
 
 
August 2016:
Players A and B are partners in a four-ball stroke play competition. On the par-5 4th hole, A lies 3 in the fairway, 20 yards short of the putting green and B lies 2 in a green-side bunker. A chips poorly and then holes his next shot. While B is preparing to play his shot out of the bunker, A, upset about the quality of his chip shot and aware that practice is permitted between the play of two holes, drops a ball on the collar of the 4th putting green and hits a practice chip shot. B then plays his bunker shot, the ball barely clearing the sand and landing on the grass slope immediately in front of the bunker. B then rakes the bunker, and after he completes the raking, his ball rolls back into the bunker and comes to rest in the freshly raked portion of the bunker. B plays another shot from the bunker, holing out. Fellow-competitor C then tells B that he, B, has incurred a two-stroke penalty for raking the portion of the bunker where his third shot ultimately came to rest. B is surprised, but agrees that the penalty is correct. The round is completed and the score card returned, with the score on the 4th hole showing a 5 for A and a 6 for B. After the card is returned but before the competition is closed, C informs the Committee of what transpired on the 4th hole. The Committee should:

A) Accept the score card as returned; A and B score a 5 on the 4th hole.

B) Leave A’s score as a 5 and change B’s score to 4; A and B score a 4 on the 4th hole.

C) Increase A’s score by 4 to a 9 and leave B’s score as a 6; A and B score a 6 on the 4th hole.

D) Increase A’s score by 4 to a 9 and leave B’s score as a 6; A and B score a 9 on the 4th hole.
 
 
July 2016:
A Committee has declared that ground under repair includes all paint dots on the course except those indicating the fronts and backs of putting greens and free relief is available for lie of ball and area of intended swing only. On the par 3 6th hole, a competitor shanks his tee shot sharply to the right towards a densely wooded area. A fellow-competitor informs him that the Notice to Players indicates that out of bounds is defined on the right side of the 6th hole by the nearest inside points at ground level of white stakes, as well as the inside edges of white dots on the ground and on trees. Unsure of where the ball came to rest, the competitor plays a provisional ball correctly to the putting green.
The competitor finds his original ball embedded in the right edge of a white dot painted on one of the trees. He marks the embedded ball in the tree, picks it out and cleans it. The competitor determines that his nearest point of relief is directly under the point where the ball embedded into the tree trunk. He measures one club-length from that point and drops the ball correctly within this area. The competitor plays the ball to the putting green.
 
As the players are approaching the putting green, the competitor informs his fellow-competitor that he took free relief from a painted dot on the tree. The fellow-competitor reminds him that he can’t take free relief from anything marking out of bounds. The competitor disagrees believing he is entitled to relief from all paint dots on the course as stated in the Notice to Players. The players agree to proceed with the competitor playing both balls and they’ll report the facts the Committee after the round. The competitor putts the provisional ball into the hole. He takes two putts to get his original ball into the hole. What is his score for the hole?
 
A) Four; the competitor proceeded correctly with the original ball

B) Four; the competitor proceeded correctly with the provisional ball. The original ball was out of bounds.

C) Six; the competitor scored correctly with the provisional ball as the original ball was out of bounds. He is penalized two strokes for playing a wrong ball when he took relief from the paint dot on the tree and played the original ball.

D) Eight; the competitor is penalized one stroke under stroke and distance and two additional strokes for playing from a wrong place when he took relief from the paint dot on the tree and played the ball.
 
 
June 2016:
A side consisting of Players A and B is playing with a side consisting of Players C and D in a Four-Ball competition.  On a par three hole, C plays from the tee and B asks what club he used. C answers and B makes sure that A has heard the answer. B plays from the tee and C asks him what club he used. B does not answer and A plays from the tee. D plays from the tee. Which players are penalized under Rule 8-1?
 
A)    All four players are penalized.

B)    Only players B and C are penalized.

C)    Player A is the only player not penalized. (Decision 8-1/25)

D)    Player D is the only player not penalized.
 
 
May 2016:
A competitor plays his third stroke onto the putting green and he marks and lifts the ball. The competitor replaces the ball, and after he addresses it, the ball begins to oscillate slightly. He steps away and places a mark behind the ball. As he’s reading the line of putt again, the ball moves. He replaces the ball in front of his mark and holes the putt. He records a five on his score card, which includes a one-stroke penalty for his ball moving after address. After he returns the score card, but before the competition has closed, the competitor discovers that Rule 18-2b no longer exists, and he reports the situation to the Committee. In ascertaining the facts, the Committee is satisfied that the competitor had not caused the ball to move. The Committee should do the following with respect to the player’s score on the 4th hole: 
 
A)    Add one penalty stroke to the player’s score for the 4th hole for a violation of R18.

B)    Add two penalty strokes to the player’s score for the 4th hole for a violation of R18.

C)    Add three penalty strokes to the player’s score for the 4th hole for a violation of R18 and R6-6d. (R18-2, Exception to R6-6d)

D)    Add four penalty strokes to the player’s score for the 4th hole for a violation of R18 and R6-6d.
 
 
April 2016:
After all players have holed out on the 9th putting green, a competitor sees his club professional and asks him to check his swing plane by simulating a swing. A fellow-competitor in the group points out to the competitor that he has broken the Rules by asking for advice. The competitor realizes his mistake and adds two strokes to his score on the 9th hole and subsequently signs and returns his score card to the Committee. If the Committee learns of the facts before the competition closes, what action should it take?


A)    The competitor correctly added two strokes to his score on the 9th hole. There is no action required.

B)    The competitor correctly added two strokes to his score on the 9th hole. The Committee should also add two strokes to his score on the 10th hole for a violation of R8-1 plus another two strokes on the 10th hole under the exception to R6-6d.

C)    The Committee should accept the score submitted for the 9th hole. The competitor should be disqualified under R6-6d for returning a score on the 10th hole that was lower than actually taken. (R6-6d, D8-1/14)

D)    The Committee should accept the score submitted for the 9th hole. The Committee should add two strokes to his score on the 10th hole for a violation of R8-1 plus another two strokes on the 10th hole under the exception to R6-6d.

 

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